Making the decision to move a loved one to an Assisted Living Residence is often the result of much research and soul searching.  Deciding whether to bring him or her back home for a visit can pose many new questions and raise new issues for the family.

Tess Young from Assisted Living Today helps you decide by presenting some pros and cons about making such a visit.  Thank you, Tess.

 

Should A Resident of Assisted Living Visit Home?

The holidays are usually the time when most families want to have everyone gather together. But for those who are living in an assisted living residence, this may or may not be the best choice. In this article we will discuss some pros and cons to help you decide whether a resident of assisted living should visit home or not.

 

The Pros of Taking a Trip Home

Bringing grandma or grandpa home for the holidays may be a positive thing for all members in many ways. While living away from family, elderly persons may feel detached or no longer part of the family in a way they wish they were. By bringing them home, you can re-live treasured moments from the past with photos, videos, songs and stories. The love of a family has a great healing power for the elderly and may find that they have renewed energy and passion even if it is only for a short time.



If loved ones have Alzheimer’s or dementia, bringing them home to familiar surroundings from their past may help them to re-live some happier times. This could be a great comfort for the whole family.

If you are worried that taking your loved ones out of their assisted living residence could affect their Medicare or insurance coverage, you need not worry. Most policies allow for trips out of the home for a little while providing that you take the steps to provide the necessary help needed for medication management, have wheelchair accessibility if necessary, and make sure they stick to their proper diet if a special one is required.

 

The Cons of Bringing Your Loved One Home

If your loved one is not very independent and needs round the clock care, you may want to re-consider bringing him or her home with you no matter how much you may want to see that relative. The holidays are a busy time of year and most people are cooking, shopping, driving around from place to place or doing many other things that may require them to be unavailable to tend to their loved one in the best way.

Another reason why some people may think it is not a good idea to bring residents home from an assisted living residence is that they could become homesick or lonely upon their return. This could send them into a depressive state that may be hard to get back out of. If you are worried about this being a problem, perhaps you could get your family together and see about paying a trip to visit them in their home. Most assisted living homes take the time to put up decorations, invite church choir groups to come sing carols, have children’s groups come in for a play or singing and other festive activities to ensure that everyone has a time to remember.

For your own loved one, if you do need to visit within his or her own home, be sure to bring some old photo albums of Christmases or other holidays gone by, a favourite ornament or memento that he or she may have, and perhaps spend a few minutes decorating the room in a festive manner. Bring some special homemade cookies or treats and bring that old smile back to your loved one’s face.

It is up to you whether or not you feel it would be in the best interest of your loved one to come home for the holidays or just have a visit from family in the assisted living home they dwell in. Remember that the holidays are a time for sharing and love. No matter where you are, just being together will be all that counts.

 

Author Bio: 

Tess Young writes about health and related information to elder care. Assisted Living Today is one of the community which takes care of elders to live their rest of life with lots of fun and entertainments. If you are in need of these community it is better to Find Assisted Living in your locality.